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Don’t Pay More in Taxes Than You Should: These Are the Most Overlooked Tax Deductions

13 Feb
2023-2_Don’t Pay More in Taxes Than You Should- These Are the Most Overlooked Tax Deductions

By: Colleen Weber

News and Updates / Tax Planning

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By Colleen Weber, CFP®, CPA

Tax season is here, and many are already feeling the stress that comes from sifting through the complexity of the tax code. However, with the right knowledge and resources, you can get the support you need to take advantage of available deductions and keep more of your hard-earned money. Read on for 6 of the most commonly overlooked deductions that can help you save on your tax return and put more in your pocket.

1. Out-of-Pocket Charitable Contributions

There’s more to charitable deductions than many people realize. Not only are the big-ticket contributions deductible, but the out-of-pocket expenses paid while volunteering or donating your time are also deductible too

For instance, if you participate in charitable activities that involve up-front expenses, these are fully deductible on your tax return. Whether you purchase canned goods for a food drive or supplies for a local school fundraiser, your contributions are deductible. If you drove your car for charitable causes in 2022, you can also deduct 14 cents per mile and the cost of tolls. 

Remember to keep your receipts and obtain verification for any contributions over $250 to make sure all your bases are covered.

2. Self-Employment Tax Deduction

For self-employed individuals, you can deduct a portion of the Social Security and Medicare tax you pay. Since self-employed individuals are required to pay both the employer and employee portion of Social Security and Medicare tax, there is a tax deduction available for the portion considered paid by the “employer.” 

The full tax is 15.3% of net earnings, but you can write off 7.65% using this deduction. The best part is that this is an above-the-line deduction, which means it can be used in conjunction with the standard deduction.

3. Student Loan Interest

Another above-the-line deduction that many people forget about is the student loan interest deduction. This deduction allows the borrower to deduct up to $2,500 of student loan interest paid over the course of the year, even if the loan is repaid by someone else. 

Here’s an example. If you took out a Parent PLUS Loan for your child to attend school and they have been the person making the payments, you can still deduct whatever interest was paid on your tax return since you are technically the borrower. In this case, the IRS assumes that your child gave you the money, and then you paid the debt yourself, thus allowing the borrower (not the payor) to receive the tax deduction.

With student loan payments on pause for the last two years, many people will not qualify. If you have consistently made payments, or if you have paid down the interest portion on any of your student loans in 2022, make sure to claim this deduction if your modified adjusted gross income is less than the phase-out threshold

4. Medicare Premiums for Self-Employed Individuals

If you’re over the age of 65, enrolled in Medicare, and continuing to run your own business, then you can deduct the premiums paid for Medicare Part B and Part D as well as the cost of any supplemental policies or the Medicare Advantage plan.

The good news is this is an above-the-line deduction, so you do not have to itemize and the premium costs will not be subject to the 7.5% AGI floor that typically applies to medical expenses. Note that you are only eligible for this deduction if you are not also covered by an employer health plan, whether that be through a second job or through your spouse’s employer.

The even better news is that even if you are not 65 and enrolled in Medicare, you can still deduct the cost of healthcare (and long-term care) premiums if you are self-employed and not covered by an employer health plan.

5. State Income Tax Refund

Many people automatically assume they are required to report a state income tax refund as income on their federal tax return. But this is not actually the case. If you did not itemize your deductions to claim the state income tax paid, then any refund received is not considered income at the federal level. 

Since most taxpayers claim the standard deduction and do not claim state and local tax deductions, the majority of those who receive a state income tax deduction do not need to report it on their Form 1040. Keep this in mind as you file your taxes this year, and don’t mistakenly report more income than is rightfully taxable.

6. Moving & Travel Expenses for Military Personnel

When the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was signed in 2017, many taxpayers lost the ability to deduct moving expenses on their tax returns. But this deduction is still available for active-duty military personnel. If you or your spouse were an active-duty military member who relocated in 2022 and you did not receive a reimbursement from the government for your move, you will be able to deduct move-related expenses including the cost of travel, lodging, moving supplies, services, and shipping.

What’s more, military reservists and National Guard members are also able to deduct the cost of work-related travel as long as the travel is overnight and more than 100 miles away from home.

Get the Most Out of Your Tax Return

Understanding the intricacies of the tax code can be overwhelming and confusing, but the right professional can make all the difference. We are dedicated to helping you get the most out of your tax returns and take advantage of any deductions you may have overlooked. We provide personalized financial planning advice to make sure you stay on top of the current tax regulations and navigate this tax season with ease. To get started, contact us to book a free introductory meeting online or call (952) 470-0750.

About Colleen

Colleen Weber is a fee-only financial advisor, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional, and CPA with more than 15 years of financial planning experience. Providing comprehensive financial planning and wealth management, she specializes in serving clients nearing retirement, retirees, busy professionals, and women. She is passionate about developing financial plans that save clients on taxes and investment strategies that help them pursue their goals. Learn more about Colleen by connecting with her on LinkedIn or booking a complimentary phone call meeting.